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Letter to Oliver Cromwell reporting the house arrest of the 2nd Earl of Lindsey

May it please your Highnesse.

In pursuance of your Instructions wee have seised the persons of the Lord Lovelace, Sir John Burlacies, Sir Thomas Pope, John Osbaldiston Esq who were included in the list sent us from your Highnesse. Sir William Waller & Col Sands are as wee heare at London & soe out of our Reache. Wee have alsoe secured the Lord of Falkland, George Nappier, Thomas Whorwood Esqs. who are dangerous & dissaffected persons. wee intend to morrow morning to send them to Worcester that being the neerest place where this conveniencie for confinement. Wee alsoe sent for my Lord of Lindsey whose residence is in this countie, a person sufficiently knowne to your Highnesse as wee suppose. But at his owne importunitie & Col. Cokes wee have adventured to leave him at his house untill your Highnesse shall signifie the contrary But wee thought \it/ a duty to act what wee did incumbent on.

May it please your Highnesse

your most faithfull Humble servants

Hen. Smith Unton Croke

Oxon June 6th 1655

Heer was in this towne one Col. Colt who formerly served the King & esteemed a very dangerous person. Wee made attempts to seise him but he having notice fledd from us & as wee heare to London.

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Letter to Oliver Cromwell reporting the house arrest of the 2nd Earl of Lindsey

Author
Henry Smith and Unton Croke
Date
6 June 1655
Medium
Manuscript

In the wake of a failed Royalist uprising in 1655, Oliver Cromwell's republican regime sought to reassert its authority. Montague Bertie, 2nd Earl of Lindsey, a leading supporter of Charles I during the Civil Wars, naturally aroused their suspicion despite having retired to private life (Smith, 'Montague Bertie', ODNB). This letter describes the measures taken to secure "dangerous & dissaffected persons" in Oxfordshire. In their letter, Smith and Croke inform the Lord Protector that "wee also sent for my Ld of Lindsey whose residence is in this countie a person sufficiently knowne to your Highnesse as wee suppose. But at his owne importunitie & Col. Cokes wee have adventured to leave him at his house." Lindsey's house arrest is most likely to have been at Rycote, it being his principal Oxfordshire seat.

Transcript

May it please your Highnesse.

In pursuance of your Instructions wee have seised the persons of the Lord Lovelace, Sir John Burlacies, Sir Thomas Pope, John Osbaldiston Esq who were included in the list sent us from your Highnesse. Sir William Waller & Col Sands are as wee heare at London & soe out of our Reache. Wee have alsoe secured the Lord of Falkland, George Nappier, Thomas Whorwood Esqs. who are dangerous & dissaffected persons. wee intend to morrow morning to send them to Worcester that being the neerest place where this conveniencie for confinement. Wee alsoe sent for my Lord of Lindsey whose residence is in this countie, a person sufficiently knowne to your Highnesse as wee suppose. But at his owne importunitie & Col. Cokes wee have adventured to leave him at his house untill your Highnesse shall signifie the contrary But wee thought \it/ a duty to act what wee did incumbent on.

May it please your Highnesse

your most faithfull Humble servants

Hen. Smith Unton Croke

Oxon June 6th 1655

Heer was in this towne one Col. Colt who formerly served the King & esteemed a very dangerous person. Wee made attempts to seise him but he having notice fledd from us & as wee heare to London.

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Very interesting. Any account of Lindsey's life I have see up to now has him sitting out the Commonwealth at his own house, Grimsthorpe in Lincolnshire. Rycote was his wife's house.

However it never seemed likely that he spent the whole of the 18 years between Edgehill and the Restoration just sitting at home. It has always been known that he was in the south to attend on the King before and after his execution. Quite possibly having buried the King he went straight from Windsor to Rycote in 1649.

Lindsey was one of four to be given keepsakes by Charles I immediately before his execution. He got the King's gloves and these were preserved by the family until destroyed in a fire at Uffington House in 1904.

Norreys 13/11/2013

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