Reveal background image
More objects Prev Next

Letter of condolence from Elizabeth I to Lord and Lady Norris on the deaths of their sons

Your most Lovinge and Afectionate Soveraigne.

Elizabeth R.

Right Trustie and right welbeloved, And right deare and welbeloved we greet you well.The bitter accidentes befallen you which is the Cause of our writinge, beinge that which toucheth you bothe with equall smarte, And our desire that all the Comforte which we wishe to you, may reatch to each of you together with our lettres. Lothe we were to have written att all, because in such accidentes (for the most parte) the offeringe of Comforte, is but the presentinge of freshe occasion of sorrowe. But yet beinge well perswaded of your Constant resolution, grownded as well on the experience of other like mishapes (which yours have seene) as also Cheefely upon your religious obedience to the worke of his hande whose strokes ar avoidable we could not forbeare to doe our parte. Partely because  we conceave that we shall therin propose our selves for an example to you, our losse in polliticke respecte (Consideringe their great merritt) beinge no lesse then yours in naturall Consideration. And partly by givinge you assuraunce that whatsoever from us may minister Comforte by demonstratinge towardes you the valeue we made of The departed, shall not faile to be ymployed to your best Contentmentes. Assuringe you that for this harde happ of yours we will give order that assone as possible he may leave his Charge in good sorte, he shalbe with you to yeald you all duety and service he may because we knowe it wold be some stay to your sorrowes, to have hym in your ey who nowe is in forraine partes and that your hard hap shall rather serve us for matter to increase our care of you then any waye to abate it. yeven under our Signett att our Honor of Hampton Corte the 6th of September 1599 in the 41th yeare of our Raigne.

← Back

Letter of condolence from Elizabeth I to Lord and Lady Norris on the deaths of their sons

Author
Elizabeth I
Date
6 September 1599
Medium
Manuscript

This letter of condolence, written in September 1599, marked the second time in two years that Elizabeth I had taken up her pen to condole Lord and Lady Norris. The Queen's previous letter had comforted Lady Norris upon the death of her son Sir John in Ireland in September 1597. The cause of Elizabeth's second letter was again Ireland, this time occasioned by the deaths of two sons. Sir Thomas, who had succeeded Sir John as President of Munster, died on 16 August from a wounded jaw sustained in a skirmish in June (CSP Ireland 1599-1600, p. 128; Calendar of Hatfield Mss., pt. 9, p. 213). Sir Henry died on 21 August following the amputation of his leg, having been wounded at Finniterstown in June (CSP Ireland 1599-1600, p. 128; Cokayne, Peerage, vol. 9, p. 645; O'Donovan, Annals of Ireland, vol. 6, p. 2119). Lord and Lady Norris received the news of their deaths on the same day, 2 September (Calendar of Hatfield Mss., part 9, pp. 344-5). In her letter, of which this is a contemporary copy, Elizabeth informs the Norrises that she has recalled their sole surviving son, Sir Edward, from his governorship of Ostend "because we knowe it wold be some stay to your sorrowes to have hym in your ey."

Transcript

Your most Lovinge and Afectionate Soveraigne.

Elizabeth R.

Right Trustie and right welbeloved, And right deare and welbeloved we greet you well.The bitter accidentes befallen you which is the Cause of our writinge, beinge that which toucheth you bothe with equall smarte, And our desire that all the Comforte which we wishe to you, may reatch to each of you together with our lettres. Lothe we were to have written att all, because in such accidentes (for the most parte) the offeringe of Comforte, is but the presentinge of freshe occasion of sorrowe. But yet beinge well perswaded of your Constant resolution, grownded as well on the experience of other like mishapes (which yours have seene) as also Cheefely upon your religious obedience to the worke of his hande whose strokes ar avoidable we could not forbeare to doe our parte. Partely because  we conceave that we shall therin propose our selves for an example to you, our losse in polliticke respecte (Consideringe their great merritt) beinge no lesse then yours in naturall Consideration. And partly by givinge you assuraunce that whatsoever from us may minister Comforte by demonstratinge towardes you the valeue we made of The departed, shall not faile to be ymployed to your best Contentmentes. Assuringe you that for this harde happ of yours we will give order that assone as possible he may leave his Charge in good sorte, he shalbe with you to yeald you all duety and service he may because we knowe it wold be some stay to your sorrowes, to have hym in your ey who nowe is in forraine partes and that your hard hap shall rather serve us for matter to increase our care of you then any waye to abate it. yeven under our Signett att our Honor of Hampton Corte the 6th of September 1599 in the 41th yeare of our Raigne.

Your comments: Add to the archive

+ Add a comment

Your e-mail address will not be revealed to the public.
HTML is forbidden, but line-breaks will be retained.
This is to prevent automatic submissions.